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  1. #1
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    QUIN1965's Avatar
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    Guide Gps not turn on and will not start

    Gps not turn on and will not start
    problem:

    The gps does not boot for more than press the power button , not even connected to the power cord. We see that the plugged in but not charging lamp turns on the gps .

    This problem is usually due to breaking load regulator .
    To fix the mess we can do two things:


    ****As we are not handyman and have no knowledge of soft soldering and basic electricity sent for service and we fix it.
    ****We are a tad hands and we know something of welders and tin.


    If you chose the one you've finished reading and looking for the official website please contact technical support.


    If instead you have chosen 2 we go with some explanations to see if they help .


    Normal when we connect the gps to running this cable goes to the regulator and the battery and the plate .
    If the regulator is broken the battery has no power but to the plate , then the green LED lights , so when the battery runs out gps not turn back on and be for lack of power .


    I 'll show you a picture in which I modified the input current regulator jumping . In the picture is also modified line speaker but is otherwise moved .

    picture.php?albumid=44&pictureid=23
    It is battery problem , which does not turn on the unit , even plugged into the cable.


    At first , despite the green light load current will not reach the battery terminal and thought I'd put an external connector, and so charge the battery directly , but I thought if to connect the charger, the light was turned green, is that reached at least the voltage charging light
    I searched points + and - near the input connector , and saw that the line did not reach the battery connector was the + , while that of - well , so just bypass the the + e ... voila!
    Battery will last less then disconnecting , feedback to the plate, but it works and load connected to the charger !

    As you can see there that the bypass connector + at + the battery connector .
    It will always be the green light ...but bear !

    It is very important not to have more than 4 hours charging because we feed on the battery and in danger of exploding. Also the gps always work this way connected to this current state even if not charging. Has the minor inconvenience that will always be the charging light on while the battery has power.

    In the image of the bridged speaker line is also shown as the speaker did not work but it was well this is a different fault I've had to make do and has nothing to do with the current topic .


    Tests conducted to arrive at the conclusion that the problem was the regulator.

    picture.php?albumid=44&pictureid=21

    GPS TEST
    Battery use of a GO (300). ONE of the connectors are different.

    Go 520 unbootable, but plugged in, the light turns green.
    I used an "external" battery of a GO 300, to see if the problem was the battery or the device ...


    picture.php?albumid=44&pictureid=22

    GPS TEST
    Function test with the "external" battery



    Go With Battery butt, connect to the 520, and this started!.
    Respite relief, the device works.
    And 520 battery?. The GO300 connect to using this as a charger, charging well.
    Once loaded butt and reconnected to its 520, this starts.
    Diagnosed the problem: No charge but not battery problem.

    Note: The first thing we will touch on a gps that will not start the bontoncito reset, because sometimes it gets stuck and the effect is the same does not start the gps.

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  3. #2
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    Magnetron's Avatar
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    Very good Tutorial Quin, I have a XL250 that has been doing similar problem of not booting, so will when I get time see if it's the same problem with charging, But I can do the replacement of components if I can get the part.
    MagnetronLegacy
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    Hello, and so where is the picture?

  5. #4
    Member Aiken Drum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddainiux View Post
    Hello, and so where is the picture?
    Without seeing the picture I will speculate a bit on the soldering points.
    There are pictures at the end of this post.



    -------"The Green Light of Death"--------
    Better known as power light on but the screen is dead


    Tomtom symptoms typical of a damaged charging regulator/zener diode
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1. When you plug in the Tomtom, the green power light comes on but Tomtom fails to start (no screen activity) and the Tomtom fails to charge

    2. If you replace the battery with a charged battery the Tomtom works but does not charge the battery when plugged in. When the battery runs out the Tomtom will not start when plugged in, the green power light is on.

    3. Maybe you smelled electrical smoke when the zener diode burned?

    Possible reasons for blown regulator/zener diode
    -------------------------------------------------------
    1. Defective car charger supplying too much voltage to Tomtom.

    2. Sometimes electrical components just go bad.

    The fix - Modification to repair a broken Tomtom having symptoms of "Green light of death"
    Steps are documented with pictures at the end of this post

    Background information
    -------------------------
    D5(for Tomtom model One Version2) and D8(for Tomtom models Go630-Go930) are locations on the TomTom circuit board for zener diodes. If the zener diode at that location gets damaged then the Tomtom will not power on, only the green LED will light up when the Tomtom is pugged in.

    The D5 and D8 locations are very near the mini-USB plug on the printed circuit board. If the zener diode has burned then the markings on the Tomtom circuit board may be gone. It is very easy to tell if the zener diode burned up just by looking at it. You should remove the damaged zener diode from the circuit board prior to soldering the jumper wire. It is ok to just remove the plastic and leave the metal stubs of the zener diode, just make sure you do not bridge the stubs together with solder when attaching the jumper wire.

    This is where the jumper wire is attached
    ------------------------------------------
    On the TT One-V2 the location to attach the jumper wire is labeled D5. It will be the lower of the two pads (inside the rectangle) facing down toward the bottom of the Tomtom One-V2. There is +5v DC present on the lower D5 pad when the Tomtom is plugged in, we will attach a jumper wire to that pad in order to supply power to the Tomtom.

    On the Go630 - Go930 models the location to attach the jumper wire is labeled D8. It will be the upper of the two pads (inside the rectangle) facing up toward the top of the Tomtom Go630 - Go930. There is +5v DC present on the upper D8 pad when the Tomtom is plugged in, we will attach a jumper wire to that pad in order to supply power to the Tomtom.

    Google search D8 tomtom or D5 tomtom and you will find pics of this diode and where it is located on the Tomtom circuit board. It will help verify the location if there are no markings on your Tomtom circuit board.

    You can verify the correct spot for the jumper wire with a multimeter, when the Tomtom is plugged in there will be +5vDC on the correct pad. The other pad will have no voltage.

    This modification requires some soldering. It adds a jumper wire from either D5 or D8 cathode (+5v DC) pad to the positive battery input on the TT using the existing red wire and existing molex plug from the battery (see pics below). This will supply continuous +5v voltage to the TT when plugged in and the TT will function. One bad side effect is the battery is removed and replaced by the jumper wire. The TT will only have power when plugged in but that is better than broken.

    Warning! You should not leave the battery connected after doing this mod because it will damage the battery and make a fire hazard, charging the 3.7v lithium batteries using more than 4.2v is asking for trouble! This mod should not be used to charge the battery because 5vDC will overcharge the battery . Look farther down in this post for an inexpensive repair method that both powers the Tomtom and charges the battery using a regulated power supply from ebay. The power supply looks (to me) small enough to mount inside the TT case. There are many choices if you do the ebay search.

    The battery has 3 wires, red(+) , black( -) , yellow(T) (middle yellow wire is thermistor temp sensor, not used for charging)

    You wonder what the temp sensor does?
    ------------------------------------------
    It is a safety feature for the charging system and battery. If the temp gets too high in the battery it could catch on fire or explode! That could happen if you leave the modified TT battery plugged in after connecting the +5v DC

    Some would ask why not just replace the diode? (I tried this)
    -------------------------------------------------
    That would not repair the defective charging regulator and did not work. From what I understand the charging regulator is the main problem, the diode gets damaged after the charging regulator malfunctions.(maybe)

    *********************************************************************

    So now you wonder if maybe there is a better way to do a repair for this issue that does not involve replacing the diode and regulator?
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Yes, there are now tiny Li-on regulated battery charging boards that can fit into the case of a TT. You would only need to supply the voltage (usually 4.5v - 5.5v DC) to the board from jumping a wire from D5 or D8 cathode +5v DC pad to positive + input side of charging board and supply the ground from somewhere on TT. Then run wires to splice into TT battery red + and black - and you have a safe battery charger that is a regulated power supply that senses charge state and stops charging when battery is charged. The charging / charged battery would power the Tomtom. Update 12-28-14: I have ordered a few of these chargers and am waiting for them to arrive. The repairs will be documented and posted to this thread.

    I supply an example of a regulated charger found on ebay that may be suitable (and price is cheap!). To make it fit into the TT case you would have to remove the mini-USB receptacle on the charger, but that is not difficult. Note that it has Led lights to indicate charging or fully charged. It will discontinue charging once the battery reached full charge.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    charger1
    ebay search TP4056 charger Module

    TP4056 charger Module

    1.Charge module- Linear charging.
    2. Current- 1A adjustable.
    3. Input voltage- 4.5V-5.5V
    4.Full charge voltage- 4.2V.

    A. Led indicator- red is charging blue is full charged.
    B. Input interface- Mini USB.
    C. Work temperature- -10 to +85.
    D. Inversed polarity- NO.

    ************************************************************
    And finally, here are the pictures of the modification to repair a broken Tomtom having symptoms of "Green light of death"

    On the TT-One V2, solder a jumper wire to the lower pad of the D5 rectangle. D5 may be silkscreened on the PCB, it is simply the location on the board where the zener diode is/was mounted. The red wire was scavenged from an old USB cable. The dark area around the soldered area is flux. The old burned charred diode was removed from the board, then the area was cleaned with acetone prior to soldering. Make sure you do not bridge the two pads (upper and lower) in the D5 rectangle together when you solder, you can check that with a multimeter if you are uncertain.

    tt1v2d5



    After cleaning with acetone you can actually see the board again. Applied clear fingernail polish to the soldered area and the exposed wire to seal the repair. You can now see the silkscreened rectangle on the PCB where the burned zener diode was removed. The wire is soldered to the lower pad in the silkscreened rectangle (remember this is Tomtom One-V2, on the Tomtom Go630 - Go930 models it is different). This pad supplies +5vDC when the TomTom is plugged in.

    tt1v2d5 2



    Battery molex plug from a Tomtom battery, this will be connected to the wire that is soldered to D5 pad.

    battwire



    The molex plug connected to the wire from D5 diode pad and plugged into the Tomtom battery connector where battery goes, no more battery with this mod.The black and yellow wires are no longer needed, black was ground and yellow was thermistor

    tt1v2wire



    The Tomtom is plugged into USB power supply and the Tomtom now works, the "green light of death" has been repaired. This repair method should be ok for any Tomtom as long as you can find the +5vDC

    tt1v2run

    Disclaimer! I take no responsibility if you burn yourself or further damage your Tomtom using these instructions. These instructions should be considered as a general guide to point you in the right direction, it is your responsibility to properly prepare prior to performing any electrical repair. It is your responsibility to use safe practices and common sense!



    Attached my notes on this problem, maybe can help someone - has diode info, etc.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Aiken Drum; 5th January 2015 at 04:11.

  6. #5
    Member Aiken Drum's Avatar
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    Default Part 2 of Repairing a Tomtom One with "Green Light of Death " Syndrome

    This repair can be done on the Tomtom One V2 (2nd Edition), One V3 (3rd Edition), One V4 (4th Edition)

    Please read the previous posts in this thread and look at the pictures, it will help you better understand these instructions. In particular, it will help you identify the D5 zener diode position on the TT motherboard.

    This post is a continuation of the previous post where we repaired a broken TT One V2 that had broken charging components. In the previous post the repair simply bypassed the charging system. That works but the battery had to be permanently removed. This procedure takes that repair one step farther - it replaces the charging system with a TP4056 charger Module. This is a better repair because we get to keep the battery. The new charger is small enough to fit into the TT One V2 case with only a minor modification to the plastic case of the TT. Like in the previous post, this repair will require some soldering.

    First thing you will need one of these, the charger used in this repair was bought on ebay - cheap!
    Do an ebay search for TP4056 Charger Module. There will be a few different types, smaller is better!
    charger1


    The TP4056 charger module needs a small modification to fit in the TT case. Take a pair of cutting pliers (side cutters) and remove the mini-usb plug. All you have to do is squeeze it with the pliers and then work it a little by hand. Be careful not to damage the TP4056 charger module with the pliers.

    usb cut1
    usb cut2
    usb cut3




    Next you solder 3 wires to the TP4056 charging module. One (black for ground) wire on the IN- pad, one (red for hot) wire on IN+ pad, and one (red for hot) wire on Bat + pad. The Bat- pad does not get a wire. The wires were scavenged from an old USB cable.

    pcb 3wires



    Next, on the Tomtom board, solder a jumper wire to the lower pad of the D5 rectangle. D5 may be silkscreened on the PCB, it is simply the location on the board where the zener diode is/was mounted. Reference my previous post in this thread for more info about the D5 location.The red wire was scavenged from an old USB cable. The dark area around the soldered area is flux. The old burned charred diode was removed from the board, then the area was cleaned with acetone prior to soldering. Make sure you do not bridge the two pads (upper and lower) in the D5 rectangle together when you solder, you can check that with a multimeter if you are uncertain. This wire will be connected to the wire soldered to IN+ on the TP4056 Charging Module prior to closing the TomTom, it is the last wire to get connected.

    tt1v2d5




    After cleaning with acetone you can actually see the board again. Applied clear fingernail polish to the soldered area and the exposed wire to seal the repair. You can now see the silkscreened rectangle on the PCB where the burned zener diode was removed. The wire is soldered to the lower pad in the silkscreened rectangle. This pad supplies +5vDC when the TomTom is plugged in.

    tt1v2d5 2




    There will be two splices made into the battery wires. The red wire (+) on the battery will be spliced to the wire soldered to the Bat+ pad on the TP4056 charger module. The black wire (-) on the battery will be spliced to the wire soldered to the IN- pad on the TP4056 charger module. The yellow wire does not get spliced.

    splices 1



    Here the TP4056 Charger Module is mounted into the back cover next to the speaker, It is held in place with Krazy Glue. A plastic rib next to the speaker, where the Bat- pad sits, was removed for clearance. The plastic cuts easily with a knife. You can see where the new red and black wires going to the battery are run along the speaker, they are now spliced to the battery. The other red wire soldered to IN+ will be attached to the wire soldered to the D5 pad on the Tomtom board, that wire supplies voltage to the TP4056 Charger Module which then supplies DC power to the Tomtom through the battery plug while also charging the battery.

    case mod1



    Electric tape now covers the battery cable splices as the battery is installed. The cables will be routed through the original wire holder. There should now be only two wires that are not connected, they are the wire soldered to D5 on the Tomtom board, and the wire soldered to IN+ on the TP4056 Charging Module. Those two wires will be connected as the case is closed up. Mine are just twisted together and covered with electric tape.

    wires taped



    The battery in place, wiring routed, Tomtom plugged in. You can see the red LED on the TP4056 is on which indicates battery charging. The battery will charge if the Tomtom is plugged in and will quit charging when fully charged except when the Tomtom is turned on. When the Tomtom is turned on and plugged in the charger will supply current to the Tomtom and battery, both the battery and TP4056 will be supplying current to the Tomtom. It takes about 2 hours to charge the Tomtom battery when not being used. The TP4056 lights a blue LED when the battery is fully charged. You could drill two small holes in the case to have a window for each LED on the TP4056 to view charging status, if wanted.

    lights



    When the cover is closing you can see very little clearance for the TP4056. The TP4056 was contacting the copper shielding so a double layer of electric tape was put on the copper shielding there to prevent shorting. A smaller TP4056 Charging Module would work better.

    closing


    The next project will the same repair on a Tomtom GO920. I will post that when I get time to play again
    Last edited by Aiken Drum; 21st March 2015 at 01:06.

 

 

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